On Brian Hopkins’ Blog Post – “Technology is Everywhere – Are you Paying Attention?”

By Joe Fisher, EVP Global Marketing, Axway

Tech evolution is no longer just about incremental evolution of the ecosystem. Enterprise architects must now strike a winning balance between tactical and strategic evolution of EA, and organizations looking to break from the pack must find disruptive technologies that will help them differentiate.

It’s easy for enterprises to get caught up in technology waves that make us feel innovative and strategic just by jumping on board and riding the momentum – whether we’re chasing concepts around big data, updating security technology, or surfing the cloud wave. But I appreciate Brian’s underlying message, which begs the question: What are the disruptive technologies that will propel businesses forward to significantly increased levels of revenue and customer engagement? I think it’s the way the consumerization of IT is changing the behavior of IT organizations, thereby changing how we buy and consume, and how we leverage technology. When applied to enterprise problems, IT consumerization can be disruptive in game-changing ways. And that’s what enterprise architects should focus on – figuring out what will drive revenue and push the organization to new heights.

One such trend is the ‘gameification’ of technology: Witness the phenomenal way games like FarmVille engage, encourage and hold audiences (i.e. customers), driving further behavior and leveraging reward systems. Isn’t that exactly what enterprises are trying to do?  You bet it is. And that’s why right now, cutting-edge companies are looking at disruptive technologies on the consumer side, and B2B companies like Axway are leveraging these technologies to build innovative business solutions.

As Brian notes, innovation-driven companies, where innovation is disruptive, are going to win. They are more exciting to their customer base and have better ‘curb appeal’ to prospects; they are more agile than the next guy, offer better services to customers, and respond more quickly to customer needs, all of which drive shareholder value, aka stock price. Game, set, match.