Posts tagged APIs
WEBINAR: Securing the Internet of Things in Healthcare

The Internet of Things enables Healthcare Organizations an Unprecedented Level of Technology Interoperability

The linking of objects as diverse as smartphones, medical devices, cars, and household appliances to sensors, each other, and the Internet is underway, and it’s known as the Internet of Things (IoT). This trend is transforming healthcare by increasing efficiency, lowering costs, and improving patient care, but with it comes various security aspects that organizations must consider. To address these aspects, Mark O’Neill and I will host a webinar on July 23rd titled “Securing the Internet of Things in Healthcare.”

The IoT offers great promise to the healthcare field, where its principles are already being applied to improve access to care, increase the quality of care, and — most importantly — reduce costs. The IoT plays a significant role in a broad range of healthcare applications, from managing chronic diseases at one end of the spectrum to preventing disease at the other. Yet, as the world grows more connected, the need for a new security model becomes even more critical. The IoT in healthcare requires innovative solutions to make sure that it securely fulfills its potential and preserves the convenience it represents.

Attendees of this webinar will learn:

•  The FDA’s recommendations for secure communication with IoT-connected medical devices

• 10 security considerations for the IoT as it relates to the various models in the healthcare industry

• Healthcare use cases for IoT 

WHAT: Webinar: “Securing The Internet Of Things In Healthcare
WHO: Atif Chaughtai, Director, Healthcare Solutions, Axway. Mark O’Neill, Vice President of Innovation, Axway.
WHEN: July 23, 2014, 1:00-2:00 p.m. EST

To register for the webinar, click here.

Download the Axway whitepaper “Top Ten Security Considerations for the Internet of Things.”

APIs in the Fast Lane

I recently contributed an article to Wired.com. Please take a look and share!

When it comes to the car of the future, we are actually much further down the road than you might think. Whilst I don’t have a time travelling DeLorean parked around the corner, we have already seen a number of steps in the right direction including self-driving car trials from Google and augmented reality from Audi that will enable us to fix our own cars.

The holdup isn’t the lack of technology, it’s the security issues. The more sophisticated we want our connected cars to be, the more personal information we are going to have to share with them. We are well aware of the benefits satellite navigation can bring but what about a voice controlled car or one that can recommend destinations based on your travel history, or where to shop based on your likes and dislikes.

For many of us, the car forms a part of our everyday lives so it has the potential to become a fantastic tool in our connected ecosystem or a potentially serious safety risk if it falls into the wrong hands. This gives car manufacturers two key challenges to address: driver safety and data safety.